Get Schooled: The History of Historically Black Colleges and Universities

Historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) are institutions of higher education in the United States that were established before the Civil Rights Act of 1964 with the intention of primarily serving the African-American community. The Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended, defines an HBCU as: “…any historically black college or university that was established prior to 1964, whose principal mission was, and is, the education of black Americans, and that is accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting agency or association determined by the Secretary [of Education] to be a reliable authority as to the quality of training offered or is, according to such an agency or association, making reasonable progress toward accreditation.” There are over 100 HBCUs but I want to share the history behind these fine institutions.

 

  In 1890, the St. Louis school system established Sumner Normal School to train black teachers. In 1929, its name was changed to Stowe Teachers College, after author Harriet Beecher Stowe, who wrote Uncle Tom’s Cabin. The U.S. Supreme Court’s 1954 decision in Brown v. Board of Education mandated integration of public-school systems. In response to this, Harris and Stowe Colleges were merged into one institution this becoming Harris-Stowe College. HSU is known for being the first public institute of teacher education. 

HBCU List

Research articles:
https://sites.ed.gov/whhbcu/one-hundred-and-five-historically-black-colleges-and-universities/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Historically_black_colleges_and_universities
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lincoln_University_(Pennsylvania)

 

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